Neck Pain

  • Disc Injuries

  • Whiplash

  • Upper Trap Tightness

  • Headaches

There are several reasons why neck pain is so common in our society. To understand why, first we must understand the design of the neck. Here are some basic concepts:

  • The upper neck is designed to be extremely flexible. The majority of neck movement occurs in the top 3 vertebrae. 

  • The lower neck is designed to be extremley stable, aka not move all that much. 

  • The upper back and torso is designed to be very stable.


Elbow Pain

  • Golfers Elbow

  • Tennis Elbow

There are several reasons why you would have elbow pain. Listed below are some reasons why you might be experiencing this.

  • Sometimes people can't fully extend or lock out their elbows, if so, the stress normally presented to an elbow that would normally be handled with a locked joint will be placed upon the soft tissues around the elbow, which are easily overwhelmed. The same explanation can be used when one can hyperextend there elbow, that is, going beyond 0 degrees.

  • When there is a lack of flexibility in the shoulders or upper torso, and a movement of the arm is made, abnormal stress are places upon the elbow. As a hinge joint (like a door), the elbow was created to move in one plane. Not side to side. When side to side forces are places upon the elbow, the soft tissues will be overwhelmed and and injury will follow.

  • When the wrists are limited in their range of motion, it will add to the innapropriate and excessive motion at the elbow and injury will follow.


Back Pain

  • Disc Injuries

  • Sacroiliac Joint Disease

  • Sciatica

  • Stenosis

Predisposing factors for back pain includes:

  • Sometimes people are born with poor flexibility in their hips as a result of their anatomy. The shapes of their hip and pelvic bones just don't lead to great movement. The majority of us, on the other hand, just don't move our hips enough in all the different ranges of motion to maintain proper flexibility. As a result, when you move your body, since the movement isn't coming from the hips, inappropriate and excessive motion will occur in the lower back and pelvis, which will lead to lower back pain.

  • When there is a lack of flexibility in the shoulders or upper torso, and a movement of the arm is made, abnormal stresses are placed upon the lower back and pelvis. The lower torso isn't designed to rotate very much, but in the absence of proper upper torso flexibility it's forced to. That leads to excessive tension and stress on the lower back.

  • Based on the explanation provided for the first two factors, an environment of excessive movement takes place in the lower back. That overburdens the lower back muscles leaving you with a feeling of tension, stiffness, or tightness. In reality that whole environment only occurs because of too much movement in the lower back and inadequate control.


Hip Pain

  • Hip Arthritis

  • Labrum Tears

  • Tight Hip Capsules

  • Hip Impingement (Femoral-Acetabular Impingement)

  • Instability of the Hip

  • Referred Low Back Pain

  • Referred Herniated Disc

  • Hip Bursitis

Most of these conditions develop over time as opposed to from a single violent mechanism. It might have been a specific event (picking up a pencil, moving a couch, etc) that pushed you over the edge, but more likely than not, the destructive factors have been building for years:

  • Sometimes people are born with poor flexiblity in their hips as a result of their anatomy. The shapes of their hip and pelvic bones just don't lead to great movement. The majority of us, on the other hand, just don't move our hips enough in all the different ranges of motion to maintain proper flexibility. As a result, when you move your body, since the movement isn't coming from the hips, innapropriate and excessive motion will occur in the lower back and pelvis, which will lead to lower back pain.

  • When there is a lack of flexibility in the shoulders or upper torso, and a movement of the arm is made, abnormal stresses are placed upon the pelvis and hips. The lower torso isn't designed to rotate very much, but in the absence of proper upper torso flexibility it's forced to. That leads to excessive tension and stress on the hips.

  • Based on the explanation provided for the first two factors, an environment of excessive movement takes place in the lower back. That overburdens the hips muscles leaving you with a feeling of tension, stiffness, or tightness. In reality that whole environment only occurs because of too much movement in the lower back and inadequate control of the hips.




Knee Pain

  • Arthritis

  • Incomplete Ligament Injuries (ACL, PCL, MCL, LCL)

  • Meniscus Tears

  • Jumper's Knee

  • Runner's Knee

Potential causes for knee pain include:

  • Within the knee there is a cartilage pancake called the meniscus. It serves to absorb shock and increase the stability of the knee. It’s very commonly injured and very commonly the source of your knee pain. Now here’s what most people don’t get. The meniscus moves! It actually slides within the knee independent of your thigh and shin bones as you bend your knee. And now here’s the problem; it can get caught! It can get caught on the differing terrains within the knee joint and start to pinch and wear. This can lead to degeneration, tearing and pain. If you can’t easily touch your heel to your butt you might have this!


Foot Pain

  • Achilles tendonitis

  • Plantar fasciitis

  • Shin splints

  • Bunions

  • Flat feet

  • Calf pulls/tears

  • Turf toe

  • Sometimes people are born with poor flexiblity in their ankles as a result of their anatomy. The majority of us, on the other hand, have excessive flexibility from side to side, and inadequate flexibility from front to back. A lot of this can occur from single or multiple ankle sprains throughout your life. Even after no longer being in pain from those old injuries, stiffness and limited flexibility can remain.

  • When there is too much or too little flexibility in the arch of the foot, it leads to more stress on surrounding joints. With the prevelance of flip flops and poor footwear in our culture, this dysfunciton is very common.

  • This may be surprising to some, but when there is poor strength and control in the hips, people are much more likely to have foot or ankle problems. Research supports this unfortunate link.